If you Google “buy CBD oil” right now you’ll get more than 5,950,000 results, but you know what’s curious? Most of these producers and distributors offer no tangible evidence to support the claim that their products are the best. Surely, lower prices are more attractive, but if I were you, I would think twice before picking the cheap CBD oil over the high quality one.
Finally, most of the products below simply contain hemp oil extract, mixed with a neutral carrier oil like hemp seed oil or coconut oil. While hemp seed oil is packed with nutrition, CBD brands are beginning to offer supplements with added ingredients that may offer additional benefits. We’ve included the complete ingredients of every product. Be sure to avoid any known allergies and investigate the pros and cons of any additional ingredients.

While there is some understanding of the shorter-term risks of cannabis use (effects on memory, attention and psychomotor function) knowledge about long-term risks of cannabis use (permanent harm to mental functioning, risks of depression and anxiety disorders) is limited, mainly because cannabis use had been prohibited, so comprehensive studies have not been undertaken.


Although most states restrict the use of CBD products to certain medical conditions, manufacturers of CBD claim their products are derived from industrial hemp, and therefore legal for anyone to use.[67] A number of these manufacturers ship CBD products to all 50 states, which the federal government has so far not intervened in.[68][69] CBD is also openly sold in head shops, health food stores, chiropractor clinics, optometrist offices, doctors offices and pharmacies in some states where such sales have not been explicitly legalized.[67][70]
Cannabis was criminalized in various countries beginning in the 19th century. The British colonies of Mauritius banned cannabis in 1840 over concerns on its effect on Indian indentured workers;[189] the same occurred in British Singapore in 1870.[190] In the United States, the first restrictions on sale of cannabis came in 1906 (in District of Columbia).[191] It was outlawed in Jamaica (then a British colony) in 1913, in South Africa in 1922, and in the United Kingdom and New Zealand in the 1920s.[192] Canada criminalized cannabis in The Opium and Narcotic Drug Act, 1923,[193] before any reports of the use of the drug in Canada, but eventually legalized its consumption for recreational and medicinal purposes in 2018.[37]
A 2012 review found that the THC content in marijuana had increased worldwide from 1970 to 2009.[146] It is unclear, however, whether the increase in THC content has caused people to consume more THC or if users adjust based on the potency of the cannabis. It is likely that the higher THC content allows people to ingest less tar. At the same time, CBD levels in seized samples have lowered, in part because of the desire to produce higher THC levels and because more illegal growers cultivate indoors using artificial lights. This helps avoid detection but reduces the CBD production of the plant.[147]
Some individuals have been found to have mutations on the CNR1 gene, which is responsible for coding the CB1 receptor (a type of receptor in cells throughout your body that interacts with cannabinoids). Issues with the CNR1 gene can ultimately result in a poorly functioning endocannabinoid system, which is an important variable when figuring out how to use CBD oil.
Today there is much contention surrounding the issue of CBD hemp oil’s effectiveness. Arguments against hemp-derived CBD contend that extraction methods and additional ingredients can be cause for concern. Hemp stalks have a much lower concentration of cannabinoids, meaning a larger amount of the plant has to be processed to extract CBD, raising the risk of contaminants being accumulated from the soil. Additionally, advocates of marijuana-derived CBD argue that CBD is most effective in conjunction with other cannabinoids (most typically THC) present in whole-plant varieties—a phenomenon known as the ‘entourage effect’.
In the past few years, just such a cure has seemingly presented itself. Amid the less common remedies that can be found on the internet—special diets, meditation, biofeedback, surgical implants—a new product has recently gained prominence: CBD oil (sometimes known simply as “hemp oil”), so named for its chief chemical compound, cannabidiol, which occurs naturally in cannabis plants. In online forums and news articles, CBD has been hailed as a new frontier in epilepsy treatment, with parents testifying that it managed to stop their children’s seizures when nothing else could.
Recent testing of cannabis products from Los Angeles marijuana dispensaries showed over 90% of tested products to contain HIGHER than normal contaminants and pesticide levels, despite organic claims. (The USDA National Organic Program does not certify organic claims on marijuana, and it’s actually not a legally permitted claim on these products.- FYI, I’m an certified IOIA, Independent Organic Inspectors Association organic processing inspector.) There’s no intrinsic difference between high-THC cannabis and low-THC cannabis that somehow renders one clean and one heavy with contaminants. As with every other crop, it is a matter of soil conditions, growing conditions and horticultural inputs. 
According to the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC), "the amount of THC present in a cannabis sample is generally used as a measure of cannabis potency."[145] The three main forms of cannabis products are the flower, resin (hashish), and oil (hash oil). The UNODC states that cannabis often contains 5% THC content, resin "can contain up to 20% THC content", and that "Cannabis oil may contain more than 60% THC content."[145]
Across all strains, Cannabis sativa L. plants contain 120 identified terpene compounds. These terpenes exist within the resin found on hemp or marijuana flowers. The scent produced by the terpenes helps to determine the quality of each particular cannabis plant strain. It also influences taste, feel, and other senses affected by interaction with the plant or its by-products.
×